Wenqi Li

Responsive image

Ethnocomputing Experiments

SHOWCASE
Second Sunday(Premiere), Pioneer Works
April 8 - April 22, 2018


TOOLS: MadMapper, Projector, Processing
ROLE: Creator, Creative Technologist
TEAM: Vanessa Rosa, Wenqi Li

A projection mapping installation. An ongoing project that seeks to understand and play with heritage algorithms using contemporary technological possibilities to imagine a future that is aware of the richness of its past.


Responsive image
Responsive image

The installation includes perspective painting for space structure, projection mapping for light and shadow, and computational patterns for narratives. In the daytime, projection mapping adds animated shader layers to the canvas to create a subtle dynamic illusion. During the night, the contrast between lighting areas and shadow areas become higher and hide painting details, which lead to another composition.

Responsive image
Responsive image
Responsive image

What the installation called “Ethnocomputing Experiments” does is the mix of different representation systems, both of them highly mathematical in their approach to lines, both are based in grid systems, yet they could hardly be more strangers one to another. Patterns are be projected over a painting inspired by an early 17th century treatise on Linear Perspective, by dutch artist Vredemen de Vries.

Responsive image
Responsive image
Responsive image

We’re doing projection mapping of a set of Angola (Chokwe, Africa) traditional patterns, known as Sona, patterns all written and animated in Processing. Logic behind traditional Angolan sand drawing, according to Paulus Gerdes. The drawings are considered mirror curves, the straight lines shows were the mirros would be located. Every time the drawing line hits a mirror it turns 45 degrees.

Responsive image
Responsive image
Responsive image
Responsive image
Responsive image

In other words, ethnomathematical studies may broaden the (intercultural) understanding of what are mathematics, of what are mathematical ideas and activities. ere cannot be a sole, uni ed view of mathematics. For a monolinthic and dominant view there is no basis. At the same time, for the other extreme, a cultural relativism concerning mathematics, there is also no ground: intercultural intelligibility seems possible.

⎯⎯⎯⎯ Paulus Gerdes